Hi guys,
In case you forgot I broke my fine 1 year (almost) old vise trying to bend a piece of larger rebar at the end of April. I looked around and couldn’t find a decent forged machinist or post vise here. I had what looked like two good leads, but both of those didn’t pan out. That left me with two options; buy another cast one and hope for the best or make one. I decided to make one. I was often tempted to make Brian Gilberts vertical vise back in the States, but since I had two post vise’s and several really nice machinist vises I had no need to do so. I didn’t make Brian’s vise here either. I took another course and it was a combination of Brian’s and a woodworkers parallel vise.

I had a discussion with my friend about the pivot point for the movable jaw and he mentioned just letting it pivot on the floor considering the way we use the vise. He mentioned having a vise like that where I used to work, I remember the vise and knew that it was actually adjustable on the bottom to make it parallel, very useful in woodworking and not actually pivoting on the floor. Taking his comments into consideration and some of Brian Gilbert’s design I combined those three thoughts and this is what I came up with.

Cutting the jaws

Cutting the jaws

Stationary jaw in place

Stationary jaw in place

 

Materials: 13mm x 7.5 cm x 30 cm flat, 4cm x 6mm x 6 meters flat bar, 3cm sq x 120cm bar, and some 22mm threaded rod, washers and nuts and some welding rod. I used  rebar for the handle.  In the future I can find a length of acme threaded rod I would prefer to use that as the regular TR tend to wear out relatively quickly in this type of use.

The 13mm flat is the base for the fixed jaw on top of the wooden post. This is the same post configuration that I had the old vise on so it is fairly well supported coming off the wall with two stabilizer brackets that I use for a tool rack.

I used the same rod that I used for the jaws as the main adjustable leg support welded on to the 4 cm flat. The heavy leg structure only goes just beyond the spindle. I didn’t have enough to go the entire length and this is the normal set up for post vises on their adjustable legs would end here. It makes sense to me.

I have leaf spring and took a section of it and bent it in the middle. I let it normalize and then heat treated it.  It appears to work, well, time will tell.

 

Side view of vise w/o spring.

Side view of vise w/o spring.

Vise w/o spring or paint

Vise w/o spring or paint

 

What is better about this and what is not. Dare I tell the truth?!!!!
Cons: I still some slight give when the jaws are tight and I go to twist. The jaws do not have a flat face, but the two surfaces mate almost perfectly and will have to use soft and hard jaw plates for a perfectly flat surface. I have to us spacers to keep the jaws parallel. The foot of the adjustable leg will eventually have to be repaired due to being beat on and only being made of mild steel.

Pros: I can smack the hell out of it and it will keep on ticking – if it breaks, bends etc. I can repair it. It is 2.5 inches wider than my old one. I have better clearance on each side. I have a bending jig between the fixed jaw and the base plate (there is a nice space there that I can use to make rings, bends etc using the jaw of the vise). I have a hook on the side that serves as my ground connector and place to hang stuff. I have a useable vise, right now for less than the cost of another cast vise. Replacement in kind is about 60 bucks, my costs in materials is about 40. Time spent building about 16 hours, cutting, cleaning and painting. Satisfaction – :0 :):):):)

 

 

Vise complete with Spring in place

Vise complete with Spring in place

Advertisements
Comments
    • Follow up comment
      If you have access to it use heavier leg material and even a set of hardened guide pins or a heavy square tube guide system to keep it from twisting. The vise is still in use today. Obviously I made it out of what was available. It serves me well.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s