Are Blacksmiths Slighted in Historic Museums?

Posted: January 7, 2015 in Uncategorized
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Hi Guys!

This year I was fortunate to have been invited to spend Christmas and New Years in Munich, Germany at my friend’s house. I had a terrific time and really didn’t set out to do much other than enjoy my friend and his wife’s company. I did however notice during my visit to the  Deutsches Museum. This is a really great science museum. I only had time to look at the Machinery, Mining and part of the Navigation and Maritime sections. There are several more and I will have to return to see them. During my time in the both the Machinery and Mining sections I noticed that they didn’t mention anything about the Blacksmiths.

There was much about the importance of the Bronze Age and how steel is and was made during the industrial era, but all the lowly Blacksmith got was a few dioramas, dimly lit behind a glass. My friend speaks and reads German fairly well and from what he told me the history and importance of the local Blacksmith was largely over looked. I was truly surprised. When one considers that everyone was dependent on the Blacksmith’s skills to make just about everything. They became the Machinist of the Day. A position of prominence in almost all communities.

Blacksmith Diorama depicting work at the anvil.

Blacksmith Diorama depicting work at the anvil.

Blacksmith Diorama - At the helve hammer

Blacksmith Diorama – At the helve hammer

So the question begs – why so little to say about the men who started it all?

Ah, caught dreaming of a bigger shop. :)

Ah, caught dreaming of a bigger shop. 🙂

Ludwig's Carriage has wheels that are from about 1874 and are Straked. The important thing here is that the gap is larger than the 1/4" standard I strove to achieve when performing wheelwright duties at COLO.

Ludwig’s Carriage has wheels that are from about 1874 and are Straked. The important thing here is that the gap is larger than the 1/4″ standard I strove to achieve when performing wheelwright duties at COLO.

The picture of the carriage wheel is important as it shows that here were certainly Master Wheelwrights making and setting the wheels on King Ludwig’s carriages. Notice the gap in the Strake (sectional metal plates that make up the tire). In today’s world 1/4 inch was always cited as being the necessary spacing. Apparently back then as I deducted 1/4″ was to stringent a requirement for good wheels. Once in a while it is good to see another’s work, especially when it justifies your position. 🙂

So if anyone else has noticed this historical slight in museums let me know. Just curious now if it is common place.

Again I hope that everyone has a Healthy and Prosperous New Year.

I forget who said this; Be generous as you can always find someone with less than you. Sooo… with that in mind, be kind when you can and give what you can.

Be Safe My Friends!

From the forge in Albania!

Vince

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Comments
  1. Anthony Pirrone says:

    happy to year 2015…………………tony……………finis

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