Posts Tagged ‘ABGT’

Hi Guys!

Just finished up the knife I was making for a friend ours that I had started before the holiday. The first pics are of the annealing tub, it is filled with ashes from a brush burn I did earlier in Nov 14.  Next up is the Master Sharpening tools and station. Hahaha, I forgot to show my my sandpaper station which I put the final edges on with. I do flat edges as that is how I learned how to put edges on. I use a piece of wood with smooth formica and a couple of pcs of wood to hold the wet/dry paper down. Rub-a-dub-dub and the finish will come out. I only have 400 grit right now, but I have an order for some 800 and 1000. I used to use a honing steel and strop for my edges, but don’t have either currently. The knife cuts paper as it is, but not as fine as I have done in the past. Bianca used told me I had to quit testing my chisels on my arm hair because it looked weird to have shaved spots on it. I could see her point. 🙂

Annealing tub

Annealing tub

Master Sharpening Tools

Master Sharpening Tools

The knife is made from a Leaf Spring of unknown origin and is about 6cm wide and maybe 4 or 5 mm thick, I forgot to measure that. The blade was forged to about its present shape and thickness about 2.5 cm. I used Walnut for the handle, nothing fancy, nice comfortable hand fit for the size. The bolster is steel, hammered out thinner and then shaped with a grinder and finished off with a file. I did use some sandpaper to take most of the file marks out of it, but my intention was not to give it a brilliant polish.
2014-12-09 10.05.26This actually works pretty good for these types of knives as the angle iron provides support while I file and sand it. I do use an angle grinder with a flap wheel to remove the bulk of the scale and indents and then I finish it off with a file and my sandpaper sharpening board.

I tried to get pictures of me hardening the edge, but they are a bit blurry. I apologize, but you get the idea. I first saw this somewhere on the internet on one of the Bladesmith sites. Maybe Don Fogg’s I don’t remember. I do know that Wade Brooks has the same type as I saw it in his shop, so I this isn’t something I made up. I heated the blade up slowly until I saw just a touch of yellow coming up to the edge and then I quenched it. I did this three times each time letting the color darken a little more until my final color of a just slightly beyond straw, but not dark straw. The file skates off of it so it is fairly sharp.

Quenching Tank

Quenching Tank

Quenching tank

Quenching tank

I just was very glad to see that I didn’t have any cracks in the blade when I was done. There is however a very slight bend at the start of the curve which I had tried to correct before and it came back. I guess I didn’t relieve all the stresses within the blade well enough. It wasn’t enough for me to redo all the work at this point. I am the only one who noticed it and I only saw it when I put the edge on it. The shine was slightly different on the edge and the sharpness wasn’t the same, so I knew something was off.

Width measurement

Width measurement

Blade and OAL Measurement

Blade and OAL Measurement

Guard measurement

Guard measurement

For those of you who don’t know – I have always left my knives rough except for the edge and unless someone is paying me for it I will continue to do so as I like that look. This is the largest knife that I can make without doing some changes to the gas forge and my forge to accommodate a longer one. That is fine with me at this point. My friend was very happy to receive it and I hope he uses and abuses it for years to come.

Thanks for stopping by!

See ya at the Forge!

Vince

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Hi Guys,

    Bianca wanted a key holder and this is what I came up with. 

Key Holder - mixed  metals

Key Holder – mixed metals

Key Holder Back

Key Holder Back


The trunk or branch is made from rebar, the hooks reduced from 1/2″ rd. I made them a while back so I had them on hand.  The 3 flowers are galvanized cold work. The yellow rose is made from the sides of an aluminum spray can. I  just rolled for the stem and cut and textured the petals a little. The vine is some Turkish Brand welding rod that doesn’t work no matter what I do, so I have plenty to use for hooks, holders, etc. i spot welded the vine on the back. The aluminum stem I crimped and epoxied to the vine. Painted with acrylic and coated with a clear acrylic of some sort.

Well there you have it!

See ya at the Forge!!!

Vince

Hello All,
It has been a while and I know many of you see my posts on Facebook as well, but for those that don’t I wanted to take this opportunity to tell you of the great time I had at the ABANA Conference 13-16 August. Marvelous time. The Demonstrators were as wide a variety as you can have and all were doing something really special for the conference. Everything was well thought out and executed by the Committee and the Volunteers. Big Thanks to All of them. Even the Conference program was well thought out, spiral bound, schedules, demonstrators bios, a few bits of blacksmith info and lined and graph paper for note taking. Perfect. I saw many taking advantage of them. So, it was time and money well spent as a conference and of course there is the added bonus that I was able to spend time with most of my friends from VAB that I haven’t seen in almost 2 years, literally I haven’t talked that much in 2 years and had a sore throat the entire time. I also got to meet several of my Facebook friends in person. There were lots more people who I should have met, but they were in my opinion overwhelmed by the crowds as demonstrators or simply too busy and I know how these events go, everyone wants a piece of everyone, so I missed probably more than a few. I can only hope they aren’t put off. Again the Conference was great! 2016 is going to be in Salt Lake City and planning will begin in earnest shortly, if you can volunteer for the committee let them know. It takes a lot of work and if they have enough hands then the burden isn’t so large on each.
Okay there’s me review and pitch for the ABANA conference. Here are a few photos of my friends and me.

Eric's trailer - camping as rough as I want it to be.

Eric’s trailer – camping as rough as I want it to be.

Me striking for Joe and his workmate

Me striking for Joe and his workmate

Me pointing out my nail.

Me pointing out my nail.

Joe at one of the workshops.

Joe at one of the workshops.

Matt likes the Fisher & Norris display

Matt likes the Fisher & Norris display

Joe pointing out his nail.

Joe pointing out his nail.

Bear, Donnie and Joe

Bear, Donnie and Joe

Everyone's happy we are in the Sat night dinner line. Matt, Joe (head), BobO and Eric.

Everyone’s happy we are in the Sat night dinner line. Matt, Joe (head), BobO and Eric.

I told you there they gave you a good portion Matt. I don't know BobO, maybe just a few more fries.

I told you there they gave you a good portion Matt. I don’t know BobO, maybe just a few more fries.

Do we really have to stay here and listen to this Joe?

Do we really have to stay here and listen to this Joe?

I've been training with Albanian women at the market. hahaha

I’ve been training with Albanian women at the market. hahaha

We know who to call next time Matt.

We know who to call next time Matt.

Eric's trailer - camping as rough as I want it to be.

Eric’s trailer – camping as rough as I want it to be.

Next post I will post some pics of the gallery and demo tents. Then it will be back to my mandolin building now that I have the tuners, strings and picks that I need.  Don’t worry eventually I will get back to doing some blacksmithing, I brought some files and hammers back with me and I have a few projects already lined up.

See ya at the Forge!!!

 

Hi Everyone!

    It has been a great two weeks here in Albania. I made a trip to the local steel supplier and picked up a few essentials to compliment the other 80 kilos of scrap rebar in various sizes I picked up when we last spoke. I have been working on my railing and have almost all the components done. On Tuesday I finished twisting the 2nd rope twist for the top of the railing and made the two floor plates to hold the newels. I have one more to make out of slightly smaller material for the wall where the railing (3 strand) will be connected to. The pickets’ bottom railing is the last really difficult thing to make. I have a couple of newel post caps to make and they will be where the railings and the newels get connected.  I am saying newels, one is a true newel and the other is a corner post. I simplified my typing, just for clarification. I did manage to do a couple of stick roses for a warm up the other day and a few leaf hooks the next. Not that I really need any hooks, but you can always give them away as gifts or just hang them on the wall and they seem to get used for something.

Twisting bracket in vise

Twisting bracket in vise

Heating the railing twist

Heating the railing twist

Newel set for twisting

Making the deck plates

Making the deck plates

Deck plates newel posts will be attached to

Deck plates newel posts will be attached to

The deck plates are about 12 cm in diameter and almost 19cm in length made from 12mm (about) bar. The Newels are 5 strands of the same and the railings are 3 strands. Of course the 3 strand was much easier to twist than the 5 strand. I twisted at least 110 cm long each piece. The total railing is only 93 cm long for both sections, it is a corner, and 95 cm tall. The pickets will be 75cm in length. It should look pretty nice when I get it all together.

      I had to replace the heavier of my helper bars for the forge. The newel twists were too heavy for it and it cracked the tube holding the bracket. Sniff, sniff, naw, I expected it to go, it was flimsy at best and it served its purpose to get things going. Most of what I have done will be repaired or at least beefed up at some point.. I used chains and turnbuckles to secure the anvil to the stump after making a couple of stubs for the forging holes. They are what the chains bite into to. It is pretty solid. Next I have to decide where I really want my anvil and stump to call home. I moved it to make the twists and I like its new location. But… if I am making smaller stuff it is what I would consider far from the forge, sort of.  I think it will stay in the new spot; I can always change it later on. I will have to make a trip to the hardware store to pick up some beefy bolts and anchors.

Anvil stub close up (2)

Anvil stub close up (2)

Anvil anchored in place (2)

Anvil anchored in place (2)

The larger vice took a beating and I will have to redo the bolts holding it down. Here again I knew they were a little small to begin with, I am surprised it has lasted this long. One of the jaw plates sheared off and I had to back out the remaining screws  out and replace them before continuing. The smaller vice isn’t set up for that sort of work and is too small for it.  I haven’t been able to make myself understood on this point; hardened bolts so I don’t know how long the new hex bolts I slotted will last. They are tighter than the original ones, we will see. This happened in the middle of a twist so I only repaired the one side and will now wait for the other side to fail before replacing the bolts there as well. Hmmm, I may not be so lucky getting the bolts out though, hmmm, now that all the twisting is done maybe I will change the screws on the other jaw before they break. That’s a good idea, I will do that. Thanks for talking me into that.

Handle for brass brush

Handle for brass brush

     My friend in VAB sent me a new brass brush. I told him to cut the handle off to save on shipping. I put a handle on it, nothing fancy,  and will try it out this weekend on a hook or rose.  I also have a new Initials touchmark stamps as I could not find the one I brought with me. Oh well.  I them purchased from Columbia Marking Tools (http://www.columbiamt.com ). Just my 3 initials VAN on one and my full last name on the other. I went wild with the later. It will last me my lifetime for sure as I don’t have plans to be making many projects large enough to warrant the larger stamp.

      I visited with an Albanian tin knocker and found that he has a hand cranked blower for charcoal and that is all he uses. Sorry no pictures, he wasn’t a photo hound, maybe the next time I visit.  He has a medium size roller and crimper for making flues and other tubes. That is the bulk of his business today. He also makes Raki (Sort of Wine) distillers. He is 70 and does this work to keep moving. It is good to keep moving he says.  At least it is someone to bounce an idea off of if I need to. He had done heavier iron work when he was a young man fabricating window grilles, gates, etc. during the communist regime.

     Of course I have had time to visit a few places. We went on a day trip to Cetinje, Montenegro and Podgorica, MNE. Both are very nice and worth another look to make sure we didn’t overlook some tourist nugget. hahaha.

Nice attempt at reproducing window grille of the Royal era Cetinje

Reproduction window grille of the Royal era Cetinje, MNE

Blacksmith I just missed in Cetinje - bummer

Blacksmith I just missed in Cetinje – bummer

     That’s all for now! See ya at the Forge!!

Vince

I started work a little earlier than I intended today. Cleaned out one half, but until I fix the roof it will continue to drop the cement ceiling down so it will need some work again to clean it out. I am also going to expand it into the other room of the building. If my plan comes together it should look very nice once I get it cleaned and fixed up.

Image

Eventually I will open up the wall inside to make it one big room, install doors and windows – there are two chimney flues so I have one for a wood stove and one for a coal forge if I can find a source. Until then I will use a gas forge that I am waiting for to arrive with my car. Hopefully in the next few weeks. Things move ahead. The language barrier for me is difficult, but I have only been here for 3 weeks now. I think I am doing okay.

In a couple of months I will be seeing ya at the forge!

I hosted the meeting of ABGT on Saturday August 11th – We had a great time, we always do. I have to admit that we eat pretty good at these events, it’s potluck and the pot has always been lucky! Here are couple of shots from that meeting

Lunch time – there’s more than what is showing here

Getting the show started

Lily Cutouts – expedited using a bandsaw

Petals ready for setting

Secret weapon – shaping and setting the petals

Lily is done – I will clean it up later

The gangs all here! Steve is taking the picture as usual Thanks Steve!

We try to conduct Hammer control training about 4-5 time a year and incorporate those lessons into a project of some sort. We also try to do two group projects a year.

See ya at the Forge!