Posts Tagged ‘Blacksmithing’

The long awaited Anvil Repair!!!!! I finally made time to repair the horn side of my anvil. Once again I was unable to find 7018 rod. Soooo…. I used the 6013 that is readily available in all sizes from 2.0mm to 4.0mm, straight from Turkey as there wasn’t any other brand available in recent months. I used about 5- 6kg  on both repairs, so I probably ground off a 1kg (2.2lbs) of that during the welding and finishing stages. So the anvil is about 10 lbs heavier.

Original damage

After cleaning it up for about an hour or so

After cleaning it up for about an hour or so

What she looked like after the 1st round.

What she looked like after the 1st round.

The color in the repair photo is much more intense than what I was looking at, just thought I would mention that.

The 2nd Round of Repair:

A close up of the repair area

Close up of the repair area.  Depth of repair is a little over 1/2 inch and about 6-7 inches long and 3-1/2 inches wide.

2015-05-05 11.13.33

The mighty machine that made it all possible. I didn’t really expect to be doing this kind of repair. Of course now…. like always, wish I had, coulda’ had, why didn’t I, etc.

Not a bad machine, but very limited. works best with 2.5mm.  Has a bit of trouble adjusting the amps for the 1 & 1.5mm. I do miss my Millers and Lincolns.

Anvil still needs a final sanding and polishing. The square in the round hole is to make it useful as a hardy and the standard stock fits into the square so I don’t have to make each hardy tenon by hand. I can always knock that tubing out.

2015-05-05 11.42.49

Side view. I built up this corner more than the rest to add a sharper edge on that side. The other side isn’t as sharp as this edge and the rest of this side serves as a rounded over edge for tighter radii than I can get on the horn.

2015-05-05 11.42.28A top view of the repair

I was able to maintain the original ring to the anvil throughout both repairs. Hardness, hmmm, no idea, not as hard as it should be, even before I repaired it. It seems to me that I retained the extra hardness that I think I acquired after the 1st round of repair to the other end.  Rebound is pretty good the hammer will bounce back a fair ways and if a hard swing I would be wearing a lump on the noggin so, that’s good enough. 🙂 So with a softer face I have to not miss and keep my work hotter.   I happy with the result.

Thanks for stopping by!

I will have another post towards the end of the month. I seem to be having a problem with picture placement in this post for some reason or other. I am sure it is me.

Stay safe!

See ya at the Forge!!!

Vince

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Hi Guys!

This year I was fortunate to have been invited to spend Christmas and New Years in Munich, Germany at my friend’s house. I had a terrific time and really didn’t set out to do much other than enjoy my friend and his wife’s company. I did however notice during my visit to the  Deutsches Museum. This is a really great science museum. I only had time to look at the Machinery, Mining and part of the Navigation and Maritime sections. There are several more and I will have to return to see them. During my time in the both the Machinery and Mining sections I noticed that they didn’t mention anything about the Blacksmiths.

There was much about the importance of the Bronze Age and how steel is and was made during the industrial era, but all the lowly Blacksmith got was a few dioramas, dimly lit behind a glass. My friend speaks and reads German fairly well and from what he told me the history and importance of the local Blacksmith was largely over looked. I was truly surprised. When one considers that everyone was dependent on the Blacksmith’s skills to make just about everything. They became the Machinist of the Day. A position of prominence in almost all communities.

Blacksmith Diorama depicting work at the anvil.

Blacksmith Diorama depicting work at the anvil.

Blacksmith Diorama - At the helve hammer

Blacksmith Diorama – At the helve hammer

So the question begs – why so little to say about the men who started it all?

Ah, caught dreaming of a bigger shop. :)

Ah, caught dreaming of a bigger shop. 🙂

Ludwig's Carriage has wheels that are from about 1874 and are Straked. The important thing here is that the gap is larger than the 1/4" standard I strove to achieve when performing wheelwright duties at COLO.

Ludwig’s Carriage has wheels that are from about 1874 and are Straked. The important thing here is that the gap is larger than the 1/4″ standard I strove to achieve when performing wheelwright duties at COLO.

The picture of the carriage wheel is important as it shows that here were certainly Master Wheelwrights making and setting the wheels on King Ludwig’s carriages. Notice the gap in the Strake (sectional metal plates that make up the tire). In today’s world 1/4 inch was always cited as being the necessary spacing. Apparently back then as I deducted 1/4″ was to stringent a requirement for good wheels. Once in a while it is good to see another’s work, especially when it justifies your position. 🙂

So if anyone else has noticed this historical slight in museums let me know. Just curious now if it is common place.

Again I hope that everyone has a Healthy and Prosperous New Year.

I forget who said this; Be generous as you can always find someone with less than you. Sooo… with that in mind, be kind when you can and give what you can.

Be Safe My Friends!

From the forge in Albania!

Vince

Hi Guys,

    Bianca wanted a key holder and this is what I came up with. 

Key Holder - mixed  metals

Key Holder – mixed metals

Key Holder Back

Key Holder Back


The trunk or branch is made from rebar, the hooks reduced from 1/2″ rd. I made them a while back so I had them on hand.  The 3 flowers are galvanized cold work. The yellow rose is made from the sides of an aluminum spray can. I  just rolled for the stem and cut and textured the petals a little. The vine is some Turkish Brand welding rod that doesn’t work no matter what I do, so I have plenty to use for hooks, holders, etc. i spot welded the vine on the back. The aluminum stem I crimped and epoxied to the vine. Painted with acrylic and coated with a clear acrylic of some sort.

Well there you have it!

See ya at the Forge!!!

Vince

Hello All,
It has been a while and I know many of you see my posts on Facebook as well, but for those that don’t I wanted to take this opportunity to tell you of the great time I had at the ABANA Conference 13-16 August. Marvelous time. The Demonstrators were as wide a variety as you can have and all were doing something really special for the conference. Everything was well thought out and executed by the Committee and the Volunteers. Big Thanks to All of them. Even the Conference program was well thought out, spiral bound, schedules, demonstrators bios, a few bits of blacksmith info and lined and graph paper for note taking. Perfect. I saw many taking advantage of them. So, it was time and money well spent as a conference and of course there is the added bonus that I was able to spend time with most of my friends from VAB that I haven’t seen in almost 2 years, literally I haven’t talked that much in 2 years and had a sore throat the entire time. I also got to meet several of my Facebook friends in person. There were lots more people who I should have met, but they were in my opinion overwhelmed by the crowds as demonstrators or simply too busy and I know how these events go, everyone wants a piece of everyone, so I missed probably more than a few. I can only hope they aren’t put off. Again the Conference was great! 2016 is going to be in Salt Lake City and planning will begin in earnest shortly, if you can volunteer for the committee let them know. It takes a lot of work and if they have enough hands then the burden isn’t so large on each.
Okay there’s me review and pitch for the ABANA conference. Here are a few photos of my friends and me.

Eric's trailer - camping as rough as I want it to be.

Eric’s trailer – camping as rough as I want it to be.

Me striking for Joe and his workmate

Me striking for Joe and his workmate

Me pointing out my nail.

Me pointing out my nail.

Joe at one of the workshops.

Joe at one of the workshops.

Matt likes the Fisher & Norris display

Matt likes the Fisher & Norris display

Joe pointing out his nail.

Joe pointing out his nail.

Bear, Donnie and Joe

Bear, Donnie and Joe

Everyone's happy we are in the Sat night dinner line. Matt, Joe (head), BobO and Eric.

Everyone’s happy we are in the Sat night dinner line. Matt, Joe (head), BobO and Eric.

I told you there they gave you a good portion Matt. I don't know BobO, maybe just a few more fries.

I told you there they gave you a good portion Matt. I don’t know BobO, maybe just a few more fries.

Do we really have to stay here and listen to this Joe?

Do we really have to stay here and listen to this Joe?

I've been training with Albanian women at the market. hahaha

I’ve been training with Albanian women at the market. hahaha

We know who to call next time Matt.

We know who to call next time Matt.

Eric's trailer - camping as rough as I want it to be.

Eric’s trailer – camping as rough as I want it to be.

Next post I will post some pics of the gallery and demo tents. Then it will be back to my mandolin building now that I have the tuners, strings and picks that I need.  Don’t worry eventually I will get back to doing some blacksmithing, I brought some files and hammers back with me and I have a few projects already lined up.

See ya at the Forge!!!

 

Hi guys,
In case you forgot I broke my fine 1 year (almost) old vise trying to bend a piece of larger rebar at the end of April. I looked around and couldn’t find a decent forged machinist or post vise here. I had what looked like two good leads, but both of those didn’t pan out. That left me with two options; buy another cast one and hope for the best or make one. I decided to make one. I was often tempted to make Brian Gilberts vertical vise back in the States, but since I had two post vise’s and several really nice machinist vises I had no need to do so. I didn’t make Brian’s vise here either. I took another course and it was a combination of Brian’s and a woodworkers parallel vise.

I had a discussion with my friend about the pivot point for the movable jaw and he mentioned just letting it pivot on the floor considering the way we use the vise. He mentioned having a vise like that where I used to work, I remember the vise and knew that it was actually adjustable on the bottom to make it parallel, very useful in woodworking and not actually pivoting on the floor. Taking his comments into consideration and some of Brian Gilbert’s design I combined those three thoughts and this is what I came up with.

Cutting the jaws

Cutting the jaws

Stationary jaw in place

Stationary jaw in place

 

Materials: 13mm x 7.5 cm x 30 cm flat, 4cm x 6mm x 6 meters flat bar, 3cm sq x 120cm bar, and some 22mm threaded rod, washers and nuts and some welding rod. I used  rebar for the handle.  In the future I can find a length of acme threaded rod I would prefer to use that as the regular TR tend to wear out relatively quickly in this type of use.

The 13mm flat is the base for the fixed jaw on top of the wooden post. This is the same post configuration that I had the old vise on so it is fairly well supported coming off the wall with two stabilizer brackets that I use for a tool rack.

I used the same rod that I used for the jaws as the main adjustable leg support welded on to the 4 cm flat. The heavy leg structure only goes just beyond the spindle. I didn’t have enough to go the entire length and this is the normal set up for post vises on their adjustable legs would end here. It makes sense to me.

I have leaf spring and took a section of it and bent it in the middle. I let it normalize and then heat treated it.  It appears to work, well, time will tell.

 

Side view of vise w/o spring.

Side view of vise w/o spring.

Vise w/o spring or paint

Vise w/o spring or paint

 

What is better about this and what is not. Dare I tell the truth?!!!!
Cons: I still some slight give when the jaws are tight and I go to twist. The jaws do not have a flat face, but the two surfaces mate almost perfectly and will have to use soft and hard jaw plates for a perfectly flat surface. I have to us spacers to keep the jaws parallel. The foot of the adjustable leg will eventually have to be repaired due to being beat on and only being made of mild steel.

Pros: I can smack the hell out of it and it will keep on ticking – if it breaks, bends etc. I can repair it. It is 2.5 inches wider than my old one. I have better clearance on each side. I have a bending jig between the fixed jaw and the base plate (there is a nice space there that I can use to make rings, bends etc using the jaw of the vise). I have a hook on the side that serves as my ground connector and place to hang stuff. I have a useable vise, right now for less than the cost of another cast vise. Replacement in kind is about 60 bucks, my costs in materials is about 40. Time spent building about 16 hours, cutting, cleaning and painting. Satisfaction – :0 :):):):)

 

 

Vise complete with Spring in place

Vise complete with Spring in place

Hi Guys,

Okay it would have been easier to just buy one, but then I wouldn’t have had the pleasure of actually building one. I have wanted to do this for a several years, but truthfully I didn’t have the motivation since I owned a Kayak and in the US they are so available what was the point. Here in Albania it turned out that they are overly expensive and difficult to obtain, so we decided to build.

At the end of today we have about 21 hours of work between the two us into the kayak. My friend Evis was a little nervous about getting into this, but now that we have the keel and side stringers on it actually looks like a kayak now both he and I are very happy. There are a few things that didn’t work out as I planned. Imagine that! I was flabbergasted! hahaha. The bow and stern didn’t work out quite as I intended and I will have to figure another way of making them functional and look pretty when done.  The first one is mine and the second Evis’s so he really gets the benefit of what we learn here and there is a lot that we learned.

Originally I was going to screw and glue the stringers to the frame. The problem is that the plywood which is very nice furniture grade plywood is just at 1/2 inch and that makes it difficult to screw into. The solution …. wire ties and glue. I did use on the first stringers the old Eygptian clamp of twisting some string, but we then remembered that this is the 21st century and we have more options. Evis’s brother mentioned the wire ties when he stopped by early in the day. I had read that online and completely forgot about using them. I was enjoying using the twisting clamp, but they were a little slow with the poly urethane glue. So far they are holding very well.

One very important thing to remember; poly-urethane glue is very difficult to remove once it adheres to your skin. It will turn black and it will be on your hands for a week or so. 🙂 Wear gloves from the on start while using this glue.

 

 

 

 

Darn Poly-urethane Glue!

Darn Poly-urethane Glue!

 

Evis Making adjustment to the frames to fit the stringers

Evis Making adjustment to the frames to fit the stringers

The frames, keel and three side stringers are set.

The frames, keel and three side stringers are set.

Me with the skeleton today 3-30-14

Me with the skeleton today 3-30-14

Initial frame set up for testing the keel

Initial frame set up for testing the keel

Keel set in place

Keel set in place

Keel laid with bottom side stringer ready to be tied to frames

Keel laid with bottom side stringer ready to be tied to frames

 

I know it isn’t blacksmithing, but as I said I will not be doing any until I get all this crap out of my shop!!!! :)))  I can’t wait to set sail in a kayak that I actually build. Pretty cool so far.

What my Blacksmith Shop looks like now

What my Blacksmith Shop looks like now

 

Thanks for stopping by,

See ya at the Forge! Soon!

Vince

Hi Guys!

We are almost 2 months into the new year, wow. I have been semi productive since returning to Shkoder the end of January. Verona was beautiful and we had a terrific time. First thing I set out to do was find a forge for charcoal. The regulator I have on my gas forge doesn’t allow me to get it hot enough to forge weld and I have several projects that I want to do that require that ability. Plus gas is a bit costly here and charcoal is suppose to be less expensive to use, current estimate is about 1/2 per hour less.

I bought a forge and blower, for more than I would have paid in the US, but I am not in the US so…. I did get it off of a guy I knew and feel confident that I paid the going value. Having said that I was really only interested in the blower, but it was a package deal. The forge was made out of sheet tin with a 1/8″ perforated plate for the inside plate. I did give it a try and it did work in that configuration, but the heat was limited to a very small work area about 2-1/2″ in diameter. You will see it in the picture. I heated up a couple of pieces of rod and attempted a drop the tongs weld and was unsuccessful. Next I tried to do a small faggot weld and while it welded I wasn’t satisfied with the results of the weld. So as I thought I needed to build a forge and blower stand. No problem I have an arc welder and I know where to get a piece of plate for the forge top.

Sheet tin forge, set up for a side blower

Sheet tin forge, set up for a side blower

The blower when I first got it on the 11 Feb. I clean and lubed it as best

The blower when I first got it on the 11 Feb. I clean and lubed it as best

I wound up getting a 1/8″ piece of deck plate and some 4″ x 1/2″ flat for the actual pot. I made the pot very shallow only about 1-3/4 deep. For charcoal this should work out just fine. I started out using charcoal in 99′, but I had a Centaur Forge brand forge and blower. The pot was about 7″ deep and I always had it full and never mounded over like I did when I switched to coke. The blower blew thru some serious charcoal, way to powerful for it. The blower I have now did a pretty good job, but as I was using it on the new forge I was concerned about the volume of air. It had plenty of force, but the volume didn’t seem to be there. I forged a 1″ x 1-1/4″ leaf and made a key ring out of it. It is a bit large, but good for garden shed keys.

Drop in Pot - w/o grate

Drop in Pot – w/o grate

backside of pot before tuyere is tack welded on.

backside of pot before tuyere is tacked welded on.

Tuyere tack welded in place

Tuyere tack welded in place

Then I started to make the basic tools for the forge; rake and shovel. I have a small picker for the gas forge and I can use that as a poker for the forge instead of making one. Okay I have the shovel head (Pan?) made. I flattened out all the deck ridges on the one side and formed the handle end to fit the shovel head.

New forge and table in use today 2-21-14

New forge and table in use today 2-21-14

Forge and blower in use today 2-21-14

Forge and blower in use today 2-21-14

At this point I am pretty happy and looking forward to finishing the shovel handle and moving on to the rake. I decided to attempt a faggot weld on a piece of 1/8 x 1″ and while I was cranking it up all of a sudden it froze up!

Bummer!  I couldn’t believe it. I have to admit there was a scraping noise when I picked it. I did clean it up as best I could before using it, but I couldn’t do much because I couldn’t get it apart without cutting solder joints, etc. I thought this was a direct drive blower, but come to find out there is a small gear drive unit and the shaft drive gear isn’t engaging anymore nor are the other two gears moving now. Now I could only know this because I took the entire blower apart, well almost. I have to borrow some wrenches to finish the disassembly tomorrow. My friend who lives next door loaned me the wrenches and also decided that I needed better lighting in the shop. He gave me a new socket and some wire to run the line for them tomorrow as well. I would have done it tonight, but I had already cleaned up for the day and didn’t feel like getting my better clothes dirty. Yes I have shirts without burn holes in them. :))

Blower disassembly

Blower disassembly

Blower disassembly

Blower disassembly

Here you can see the missing fan blade and the edge of the larger gear.

Here you can see the missing fan blade and the edge of the larger gear.

Now I have to tell you the tool guy tells me I should improve the blower since I am working on it and once I get it all apart I will decide if I am going with the existing version or making a few modifications: Increase blower blade size, I can make them wider without increasing their diameter allowing me to use the existing case, Add a small flywheel at both or either end of the crank shaft, Increase the exhaust port and tubing. I am pretty sure I will do both the 1st and last mods. The flywheels will depend on if I can find them or not. Of course I guess I could use my 1/2″ x 4″ and make a couple of small ones, but I don’t think that size will add much of a bang for the effort. I could weld two pieces together and then have an 8″ diameter wheel and that might add a small advantage. I will let you know what I decide to do as soon as I make the modifications.

Thanks for stopping by and I am sure we will have a happy ending from out of this. :))) I get a chance to fix and improve something! hahaha.

See ya at the Forge!!!

Vince