Posts Tagged ‘ironwork’

Hi Guys!

The process was pretty much the same this time around. This one I made in the new charcoal forge I made and it worked out very well. I made the members of the cross out of flat, twisted them and then flattened them back out again. I counter sunk and chiseled the hole for the rivet, which was a 4mm bolt with the head rounded over, cold, and then cut and hammered into place cold. Overall length of the cross is about 24 CM and 16 wide. I used a piece of galvanized for the INRI banner on top. I have an abundance of small pcs with nothing to do.
I guess the real big difference here was that I actually took the time to make new chisels – I used re-bar like I have hundreds of times in the past, but here the re-bar appears to be to soft. This is the first time I have ever been disappointed by a re-bar tool. In this case it was all three chisels. I think they started to mushroom out before the hammer hit them. Hahaha. Oh well. I finished the body of Christ up with my other chisels and will be making all my new chisels out of the either leaf spring or some breaker bar I have, but that is some big stuff to reduce for smaller sized chisels like I need.

Crucifix Front

Crucifix Front

The process went something like this – 4cm x 5mm thick x about 30 cm long. Mark out and cut arms, legs, head. Shape head first, then spread and shape arms. Mark the beard line and chisel and lift a little. A little fullering under the beard line will make it stand out more. Use chisel and punch to put eyes, nose and mouth on face. On the head and chest cavity you want to round it up on a stake tool to give it a more natural appearance. Flat will work, but rounding it gives a little better look.
Eyes should be about in the center of the face, mouth 2/3 from top and the nose between. This is using standard drawing sizing. Ears which are not an issue here, should be from the corner of the mouth to the outside corner of the eyes. Bodies should be about 7.5 times the size of the head and average shoulders 2 times the head height. So a 2cm long head = a 15 cm long neck to foot plus 2 cm for head for a total of 17 cm with a shoulder width of about 4 CM. Arms width is equal to about the total height for the figure finger tip to finger tip. Just for reference if you ever need it.
Okay back to the body, after I get the arms about right, I figure out the rib lines and fuller the stomach to give it a drawn in look and to define the chest cavity. I am concerned where the stomach section ends as I want to define the loincloth by having it raised a little from it. I add some fold lines and define where the legs enter the loincloth again fullering them a little to define them away from the cloth. Finish fullering the center of the legs I like to fuller it beyond the front on the backside, at an angle, so it gives a little better perception of depth for the legs. Finish rounding over the legs, slight indent for the knees and ankles, flatten feet a little, etc. These elements can be refined as much as you desire to. I wasn’t trying to make an exact replica of a body, but give the impression of one. Now I pick the lowest visible rib and use a chisel to impart a spear wound. I am done.
I use nails that I have squared up the heads a little and put them through the drilled holes in the hands and feet. I do the same for INRI placard. I trim the nails to length and bend over pulling them tight. I guess like anything else there are better ways to do this, but it holds the body very firmly from what I have seen so far and it isn’t seen hanging on the wall anyway. On a larger scaled crucifix you might want to actually forge some square and larger headed nails.

Crucifix Back - nails look like they stick out but they don't.

Crucifix Back – nails look like they stick out but they don’t.

 

Well hope you enjoyed the write up anyway. You know how it is sometimes when you are working, you just keep working and forget to take photos. At least I do. I am lucky I remember to put my touchmark on most things. I wound up putting it on cold. Oh well. I will do better next time, I will do better next time, I will do better next time. Hey I didn’t drift off to Kansas. hahaha. Til next time!

See ya at the Forge!!

Vince

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Greetings and Salutations!!

       Yesterday I published my book ahead of schedule!  Of course I very happy. The book is about building Cannon Carriages which included the ironwork for me. We did it all over the 13 years I was at Colonial National Historical Park. It was a great time and I hope to pass on the tricks and things I learned about making historic reproductions. I am of the belief that those of us engaged in the old trades need to write down those skills and tricks or else they will be lost and some of them will never be rediscovered. History is in the details and many are lost everyday.
It is available only at https://www.createspace.com/4515785 for the next week after that Amazon picks it up and then Amazon Europe and in 5-6 weeks it is available for purchase by libraries and bookstores. It is in Black and White to keep the cost down.”It was done that way by the Master before,
and the one before him,
What need to write it down?”
What to do with all the time now? Hmmmm,
See ya at the Forge!Vince

“1781 Siege of Yorktown Cannon Carriages” by Vince Nakovics
Book Cover

Book Cover

Back of Book

Back of Book

      So what have I been up to.  Not much I have been busy attending to my much neglected book and I am happy with the progress on that front. I did manage to make a few smaller things of original design and discover that I managed to mess up my own design. Lesson learned again… pay attention to what you are doing.  Both the coat hooks came out okay, but not the same length which is what I was after. For some reason I wrote down the wrong measurement on the second one! The shorter one is 11CM instead of the 18 CM on the body length.  I needed that measurement to be the same for both.  Oh well they are for me and now I have both processes down. These hooks keep you from getting those annoying pointy spots on the coats you hang up.

     Next up was a Fredrick’s Cross out of round bar. Came out okay and I just wanted to know that I could do the entire thing at the anvil.

       I had a nice chat with the ESAB region manager about product availability and possibly introduced him to a person that is interested in taking over this area to do provide quality welding equipment and accessories. That is sorely needed here. In a couple of years we will see if that happens.

       I also played around with making an axe with a wrapped head rather than a traditional drifted eye for a wooden handle. What did I learn, hmmm. I can do it all with hammer and anvil.

       My wife wanted some hooks to hang her robe on in the bedroom and wala here it is.

        My friend Evis stopped by and I showed him how to make a rose. He was short on time and we didn’t take a picture of the finished product, but it was a quick study with satisfactory results. Always a crowd pleaser, roses. 🙂

Without further ado:

Making a rose

Making a rose

Towel bar - notice no bunching of the towel allows it to dry completely

Towel bar – notice no bunching of the towel allows it to dry completely

Rd Bar Fredrick Crosses

Rd Bar Fredrick Crosses

Coat Hooks

Coat Hooks

My drawing board

My drawing board

DSCN1044

This is a set of hooks I made to our robes on in our bedroom.

Axe Head - mild steel test

Axe Head – mild steel test

Axe head - steel handle - wrap holding head

Axe head – steel handle – wrap holding head

Axe head detail

Axe head detail

Axe head detail 1

Axe head detail 1

Axe head Detail 2

Axe head Detail 2

Me forging a rose 2

Me forging a rose 2

Hi Guys!!

I have been gone because of a couple of visitors here and then I had a very nasty cold that clogged my ears and made me dizzy as heck. The room was actually spinning from it. I never had motion sickness and my wife tells me that is what it feels like, nausea, then finally the mad rush to the toilet. Okay enough on that the cold and the clogged ears are gone. Right on schedule, 13 days from the first symptom.

Here are the pictures of the Nightstands with glass in place.

Nightstand Finished in place

Nightstand Finished in place

I was concerned that the corner brackets were going to be too bulky for this table, but they look just fine when you look down on them. They remind me of the  picture corners used in scrapbooks. Wife is happy and they look pretty nice now that I haven’t looked at them for a while. I don’t see every nick or ding that displeased me before. It is always best to look at your work after a few days or in this case weeks, they always seem to look better.

Nightstands

Nightstands

I started work on a Door Knocker for a friend of mine. I had originally wanted to make it from a single piece, but I couldn’t find material large enough to let me do it that way. I still have a problem  with my gas forge obtaining welding heat so I am having to weld it. I have a wonderful stick welder as we all know. :)) I will have a little bit of grinding to do when I am done and I just love to grind, not! Let me not lament on things past and sally forth with a smile on my face and a hammer in my hand. Here are few pictures of the work that I have done so far.

The four fingers are made from a piece of round stock about 11mm and the thumb is made from a piece of rebar about 16 mm in dia. I outlined the finger nails with my dremel tool and then made the lines a little crisper with a chisel. the joint and knuckle creases were put in with a chisel. I did all of the line work cold. I am hoping that the creases will open slightly when I bend the fingers and the sharp edge will be softened by using a wire wheel to clean them up.

A finger here a finger there.

A finger here a finger there.

The hand takes shape

Palm of hand

Palm of hand

I expect to add another layer of weld on the outside and then shape it with the grinder. At this point I will then decide what best way to attach a hinge to it. I might use the middle finger’s excess length for the male part of the hinge and then make the female end with the post to fit it. It is my intention to use a cuff to hide the hinge. We will see. I have it drawn out, but I have never made one of these, so I am in the spirit of the 18th century Blacksmiths making each piece fit as I go. No interchangeable parts required. :))

Thanks for stopping by;

See ya at the Forge!!

Vince

Hi Guys,

     The railing is done and this is where I am with the next project as promised.

We need extra high nightstands because our bed was made higher than usual. We thought we would get a rolling storage system built for our clothes, but as it turned out we didn’t really need it. We could cut the legs off the bed, but then that becomes a problem to match the color and get out and bring it back in. The head and foot boards aren’t light and Bianca can’t hold them to twist them around the corners, sooo it stays as is. No problem, I like the height of the bed. Back to the nightstands.

They are 50 cm Wide x 35 cm Deep x 73 cm Tall. The material I am using is a compromise as they didn’t have the size I would have preferred. I am using a 2.5 mm 30 x 30 cm angle iron for the legs. The top is a 2.5mm x 40mm flat, embossed.

The legs have a cabriole styling to them. Which I hope will make them look more elegant than just a taper, but certainly a little more difficult to provide.

I plan on using a cross bracing system for the legs as the angle iron is a little light to stand without it. Compromise, compromise. No problem I can make it work.

Here are the pictures in progress so far:

Nightstand Top

Nightstand Top

Embossed or Knurled design for top edging. Before welding the corner.

    I want to point out that the legs were done in 2 parts. I probably could have made a jig out of some square bar forming the lines of the legs. Not having bent much angle iron in this manner and with this light stuff it tends to twist easily I choose to do each one individually and as stated in  2 parts. I bent all the tops and started the knees 1st. Then I did the lower legs finishing the curve of the leg into the ankle finishing with a reverse bend. The fee will be finished later on as I have not yet found a leveler to use for them. My floor in my bedroom has some serious level issued. Hey it’s been used and abused for the last 150 years or so. So I have a couple of options and I don’t have to do anything right at this moment. I have two more stores to check out 1st, if they don’t bare fruit I will have to make one with a nut bolt and washer. Nothing that hasn’t been done before. I would have liked one with a plastic bottom for the floor. Some things aren’t easy to find here in Albania. Regardless the project is moving ahead! I will let you know how the leveling goes. Hahaha.

Top Bend

Top Bend

This is how I measured the top of the leg before and after bending .

Length of Leg Top

Length of Leg Top

Here is the bend check line. Each leg has this starting bend on the top.

Curvature of leg

Curvature of leg

The curve of the Knee and leg are checked against this line.

Ankle Curvature

Ankle Curvature

The curve of the ankle is checked against the line.

So Far So Good!

Anvil Marked off with Jig

Anvil Marked off with Jig

My anvil marked for curving the lower legs and the angle iron I am using to make the curves with. As you can see I spared no expense in making my special tool.

8 Legs

8 Legs

Here are the legs; a couple have a twist that will need to be undone; #2, #7 and # 8 needs a deeper bend in the top and slight more curve in the ankle. I am happy with the progress of this project so far.

Thanks for stopping by

See ya at the Forge!

Vince

Hi Guys!

    I finished my railing project today and will attach it to the wall and floor tomorrow. It was an interesting project and here are the last few photos of the railing in progress and final fit check around the trap door, but first a few process photos.

Railing section with feet attached

Railing section with feet attached

Railing foot detail

Railing foot detail

Precision tools for perfect square.

Precision tools for perfect square.

Both sections attached Plumb and Square

Both sections attached Plumb and Square

Corner Newel Topper detail

Corner Newel Topper detail

Let me tell you I struggled with this topper. I would have preferred to do a nice wrap of both the newel joints, but without a torch or a standard coal forge there was no way to make it happen and look right. I tried two different other covers and decided that the joint by the handle looks fine without and after some welding and grinding magic the corner newel was ready for the topper shown here. Wife likes it and told me it is good to go!  At 2 feet you can see my magic,but at 5 feet they are invisible, except for me because it’s all I can see. hahaha. You know how that goes.

Final fit test - It is perfect!

Final fit test – It is perfect!

Another view of the final fit test.

Another view of the final fit test.

The railing is just resting against the wall right now and the wall brackets fit nice and flat as do the feet. As you can see in the picture it is nice and straight and the newels are plumb. Overall I am happy with its appearance and since I really didn’t expect to be doing this type of work with what I have in my shop right now I am pleased with the way it came out. I did manage to do some dumb things even though I drew it out, but half the time I didn’t keep the drawing available so naturally it made for minor mistakes.

On the other hand it was a good starter project for the gas forge. It made me make smaller parts and figure out how to put them together. I would have preferred a more traditional process, but with the regulator I have I cannot get to welding temperature, so that means I had to resort to more Arc welding than I ever have done on any project to date.

I do have a power supply problem that is not easily corrected and this causes my welder to operate a little under par. I did figure out the only way to get a good bead run is to preheat the rod on a scrap piece and then move to the good piece. This is even with the better ESAB rod.

As my friends will tell you I like to do projects that challenge me from time to time and this was a fun project that taught me a lot about my new shop’s limitations and processes. My next project a couple of simple Nightstands will go much smoother now.

Hope you enjoyed the project and pictures. I will post some of the new project next week.

Thanks for stopping by and as always

See ya at the Forge!

Vince

Hi Guys!

Yesterday I finished assembling the rail sections, but the hard part is connecting them together and I hope to finish it up this week. The days have been near 100 degrees during the afternoons, so I have been coasting.

Image

I took the easy way out and used my welder. The wife told me she doesn’t mind at all, so the customer is happy so far, so I am as well. When they are touched up they will look just fine.

Yesterday I had just finished up welding the pickets to the handrail when I noticed that the end curl was off to one side. Bummer, now I had to put it back in the forge and straighten it out. Not that big a deal, it was just that it was still hot and about 1700. I thought I was done for the day. Oh well. It is a great project and I enjoy the aspect that I don’t have to rethink the entire process to fit the smaller forge. Interesting work to say the least.

Image

This is my temporary welding table.

 

Well that’s all for now! I’ll See ya at the Forge!!

Vince