Posts Tagged ‘Vince Nakovics’

Hi Guys!

I  finished skinning the kayak. I have to admit pulling and squeezing the canvas was a good workout for my fingers. 🙂 Of course I made one mistake when sewing the bow and that made sewing the stern more difficult than it should have been. I wound up with two wrinkles on the top that I just couldn’t stretch out. I had a good laugh at myself and I think I worked around it rather nicely. I will say this, I wish I had made a cockpit frame for sewing that section. I now realize that doing so would have made it easier to get and keep the wrinkles out, even with the square opening. I chose to staple the cockpit, mixing the techniques worked, but I think I would have been better off using just one.  Time will tell.

Alternative uses for an anvil and forge. Hahaha,

Alternative uses for an anvil and forge. Hahaha,

Since I used my forge and anvil to skin my kayak does that mean the kayak was forged? 🙂
I forgot to take a picture of the frame after I applied the waterproofer, it has a greenish tint in case you were wondering.
I wet down the skin and let it dry in the sun, since it was about 97 – f or 36/37 – C it would dry faster than I could blow dry it, s on top of my car in the sun. It was bone dry in about an hour. I didn’t see any noticeable shrinkage. Maybe the fabric is already pre-shrunk. Anyway. Next step is to paint it. The only place that I am concerned about is the stern as the seam went a little lower than I would have liked and worry that it will not get fully penetrated with paint and that will cause it to act as a wick. I know, I know people have been doing these for years. The first of anything is always the most fun, I have built two others but not with this type of skin, Soooo…. It is my first, exciting. 🙂
Here’s few pictures of the skinning process. When I am done I will post it and the maiden voyage. You don’t have a kayak until it floats in the water!
Thanks for stopping by!   Vince

The bow running stitch

The bow running stitch

The bow finished

The bow finished

This is how much the canvas stretched about 1-1/4 inches / about 4 cm - towards the stern.

This is how much the canvas stretched about 1-1/4 inches /  4 cm – towards the stern.

Stretching and stitching the stern

Stretching and stitching the stern

Rolling and stitching the stern seam.

Rolling and stitching the stern seam.

Stern with some of the cockpit

Stern with some of the cockpit

In a time before man became civilized some battles were too costly. Civility had begun to make its way into the minds of the leaders of the clans. In the darkness of a cave resides the old wizard, mystic, master of fire and shaper of iron. He has developed a new tool to develop the strategic thinking. Here one is made,  reminiscent of days of old and yet somehow a reminder that all that was still is.

Hi Guys!
I made this for my friend. The idea came to me, and probably had seen one before, when I was looking at some Medieval stuff for a book that I was, might still do later on. Since my friend lives in Germany it just clicked in my mind. There are some leaps to connect these dots for sure. Hahaha.

DSCN2216

I like to make things with a minimum of tools and this was no different. I don’t have a lot of tools in my shop at this point anyway so sometimes it makes me be work differently than I am still inclined to do so. Ah if only I had a machine…. 🙂

Parts

Miniatures are a bit of a PIA to make. I deviated a little in design and they all fit on a 3.5cm square. The Pawns are 2 different style anvils, one an English style, the other European style. The European style fit on the diagonal as they kept coming out slightly longer. I think I was having too much fun making them and the size was small enough, but easy enough to make, so I just kept making them. Yes I could have filed them down to size and I did clean all the pieces up in a few spots, but I wanted them to be off the anvil as much as possible. Why? It is what I wanted.

Waiting for Rook Bodies to heat up
The Kings are about 12 cm tall, Queens about 11.5 cm, Bishops 11 cm, Knights 10.5, Rooks 8 and the Pawns about 5 cm tall. Pretty much straight forging. I started with the Pawns (anvils), then the King and Queens (hammers) and moved down the line. The Bishops are Tongs as we all know the Francis Whitaker’s quote, “If you cannot hold it, you cannot work it” and so rightly belong in the hierarchy of tools. The knights (files) were originally going to have a punch and chisel with them, but that was a lot to fit on that base so I set the punch and chisel aside. The Rooks were a challenge, what could represent them. Ahh, ha! A Swage Block upon an obelisk would do the trick.

2015-04-15 16.27.36     To dress things up a bit I had originally thought of using copper and steel wire to wrap the King and Queen handles in, but discovered all the solid wire was too large. I had copper wire, what I would call a #12 and even that was a bit large. 14 or 16 gage was what I had in mind, so I did away with the wrap down the handles and used it just around the heads and 3-4 turns under them. I had plenty of steel wire to use, but matched the copper wrapping for some balance between the pieces. I did drill the hole for the Tong Rivet and the Hammer handles. I allowed myself this luxury. Some guy’s voice in the back of my head kept telling me to make it easy on myself. Hahaha. He knows who he is. 🙂

20150425_13310720150425_133313    The box was an afterthought that my wife put there. I was going to have a wooden one made, but she reminded me I could just make one out of wood or metal myself. Yeah, but…. And the next day I looked around, I had some galvanized sheet that I am never going to use, so… a bend here and there later, Viola! I had a small piece of copper sheet and a brass dial holder from a long ago project still in my repousse tool kit that is what is on the top. The belts are new and I just cut and tipped them with the same galv. sheet. It has been a long time since I made a sheet metal box and I made several mistakes, but managed to make is all work. Finish is just wire wheeled and clear coated. I did use a regular rivet gun and then flattened them with a hammer. The metal guys didn’t have any smaller stock and I didn’t feel like making (50) 1/8” rivets out of my ½ round or square bar. Call me lazy. 🙂

There you have it. Oh the best is my friend loved the set, so it is a success. 🙂

DSCN2239Historical Note: No one really knows who invented Chess, but surely it could have been a Blacksmith! 🙂

The long awaited Anvil Repair!!!!! I finally made time to repair the horn side of my anvil. Once again I was unable to find 7018 rod. Soooo…. I used the 6013 that is readily available in all sizes from 2.0mm to 4.0mm, straight from Turkey as there wasn’t any other brand available in recent months. I used about 5- 6kg  on both repairs, so I probably ground off a 1kg (2.2lbs) of that during the welding and finishing stages. So the anvil is about 10 lbs heavier.

Original damage

After cleaning it up for about an hour or so

After cleaning it up for about an hour or so

What she looked like after the 1st round.

What she looked like after the 1st round.

The color in the repair photo is much more intense than what I was looking at, just thought I would mention that.

The 2nd Round of Repair:

A close up of the repair area

Close up of the repair area.  Depth of repair is a little over 1/2 inch and about 6-7 inches long and 3-1/2 inches wide.

2015-05-05 11.13.33

The mighty machine that made it all possible. I didn’t really expect to be doing this kind of repair. Of course now…. like always, wish I had, coulda’ had, why didn’t I, etc.

Not a bad machine, but very limited. works best with 2.5mm.  Has a bit of trouble adjusting the amps for the 1 & 1.5mm. I do miss my Millers and Lincolns.

Anvil still needs a final sanding and polishing. The square in the round hole is to make it useful as a hardy and the standard stock fits into the square so I don’t have to make each hardy tenon by hand. I can always knock that tubing out.

2015-05-05 11.42.49

Side view. I built up this corner more than the rest to add a sharper edge on that side. The other side isn’t as sharp as this edge and the rest of this side serves as a rounded over edge for tighter radii than I can get on the horn.

2015-05-05 11.42.28A top view of the repair

I was able to maintain the original ring to the anvil throughout both repairs. Hardness, hmmm, no idea, not as hard as it should be, even before I repaired it. It seems to me that I retained the extra hardness that I think I acquired after the 1st round of repair to the other end.  Rebound is pretty good the hammer will bounce back a fair ways and if a hard swing I would be wearing a lump on the noggin so, that’s good enough. 🙂 So with a softer face I have to not miss and keep my work hotter.   I happy with the result.

Thanks for stopping by!

I will have another post towards the end of the month. I seem to be having a problem with picture placement in this post for some reason or other. I am sure it is me.

Stay safe!

See ya at the Forge!!!

Vince

Hi Guys!

Just finished up the knife I was making for a friend ours that I had started before the holiday. The first pics are of the annealing tub, it is filled with ashes from a brush burn I did earlier in Nov 14.  Next up is the Master Sharpening tools and station. Hahaha, I forgot to show my my sandpaper station which I put the final edges on with. I do flat edges as that is how I learned how to put edges on. I use a piece of wood with smooth formica and a couple of pcs of wood to hold the wet/dry paper down. Rub-a-dub-dub and the finish will come out. I only have 400 grit right now, but I have an order for some 800 and 1000. I used to use a honing steel and strop for my edges, but don’t have either currently. The knife cuts paper as it is, but not as fine as I have done in the past. Bianca used told me I had to quit testing my chisels on my arm hair because it looked weird to have shaved spots on it. I could see her point. 🙂

Annealing tub

Annealing tub

Master Sharpening Tools

Master Sharpening Tools

The knife is made from a Leaf Spring of unknown origin and is about 6cm wide and maybe 4 or 5 mm thick, I forgot to measure that. The blade was forged to about its present shape and thickness about 2.5 cm. I used Walnut for the handle, nothing fancy, nice comfortable hand fit for the size. The bolster is steel, hammered out thinner and then shaped with a grinder and finished off with a file. I did use some sandpaper to take most of the file marks out of it, but my intention was not to give it a brilliant polish.
2014-12-09 10.05.26This actually works pretty good for these types of knives as the angle iron provides support while I file and sand it. I do use an angle grinder with a flap wheel to remove the bulk of the scale and indents and then I finish it off with a file and my sandpaper sharpening board.

I tried to get pictures of me hardening the edge, but they are a bit blurry. I apologize, but you get the idea. I first saw this somewhere on the internet on one of the Bladesmith sites. Maybe Don Fogg’s I don’t remember. I do know that Wade Brooks has the same type as I saw it in his shop, so I this isn’t something I made up. I heated the blade up slowly until I saw just a touch of yellow coming up to the edge and then I quenched it. I did this three times each time letting the color darken a little more until my final color of a just slightly beyond straw, but not dark straw. The file skates off of it so it is fairly sharp.

Quenching Tank

Quenching Tank

Quenching tank

Quenching tank

I just was very glad to see that I didn’t have any cracks in the blade when I was done. There is however a very slight bend at the start of the curve which I had tried to correct before and it came back. I guess I didn’t relieve all the stresses within the blade well enough. It wasn’t enough for me to redo all the work at this point. I am the only one who noticed it and I only saw it when I put the edge on it. The shine was slightly different on the edge and the sharpness wasn’t the same, so I knew something was off.

Width measurement

Width measurement

Blade and OAL Measurement

Blade and OAL Measurement

Guard measurement

Guard measurement

For those of you who don’t know – I have always left my knives rough except for the edge and unless someone is paying me for it I will continue to do so as I like that look. This is the largest knife that I can make without doing some changes to the gas forge and my forge to accommodate a longer one. That is fine with me at this point. My friend was very happy to receive it and I hope he uses and abuses it for years to come.

Thanks for stopping by!

See ya at the Forge!

Vince

Hi Guys!

This year I was fortunate to have been invited to spend Christmas and New Years in Munich, Germany at my friend’s house. I had a terrific time and really didn’t set out to do much other than enjoy my friend and his wife’s company. I did however notice during my visit to the  Deutsches Museum. This is a really great science museum. I only had time to look at the Machinery, Mining and part of the Navigation and Maritime sections. There are several more and I will have to return to see them. During my time in the both the Machinery and Mining sections I noticed that they didn’t mention anything about the Blacksmiths.

There was much about the importance of the Bronze Age and how steel is and was made during the industrial era, but all the lowly Blacksmith got was a few dioramas, dimly lit behind a glass. My friend speaks and reads German fairly well and from what he told me the history and importance of the local Blacksmith was largely over looked. I was truly surprised. When one considers that everyone was dependent on the Blacksmith’s skills to make just about everything. They became the Machinist of the Day. A position of prominence in almost all communities.

Blacksmith Diorama depicting work at the anvil.

Blacksmith Diorama depicting work at the anvil.

Blacksmith Diorama - At the helve hammer

Blacksmith Diorama – At the helve hammer

So the question begs – why so little to say about the men who started it all?

Ah, caught dreaming of a bigger shop. :)

Ah, caught dreaming of a bigger shop. 🙂

Ludwig's Carriage has wheels that are from about 1874 and are Straked. The important thing here is that the gap is larger than the 1/4" standard I strove to achieve when performing wheelwright duties at COLO.

Ludwig’s Carriage has wheels that are from about 1874 and are Straked. The important thing here is that the gap is larger than the 1/4″ standard I strove to achieve when performing wheelwright duties at COLO.

The picture of the carriage wheel is important as it shows that here were certainly Master Wheelwrights making and setting the wheels on King Ludwig’s carriages. Notice the gap in the Strake (sectional metal plates that make up the tire). In today’s world 1/4 inch was always cited as being the necessary spacing. Apparently back then as I deducted 1/4″ was to stringent a requirement for good wheels. Once in a while it is good to see another’s work, especially when it justifies your position. 🙂

So if anyone else has noticed this historical slight in museums let me know. Just curious now if it is common place.

Again I hope that everyone has a Healthy and Prosperous New Year.

I forget who said this; Be generous as you can always find someone with less than you. Sooo… with that in mind, be kind when you can and give what you can.

Be Safe My Friends!

From the forge in Albania!

Vince

Hello All,
It has been a while and I know many of you see my posts on Facebook as well, but for those that don’t I wanted to take this opportunity to tell you of the great time I had at the ABANA Conference 13-16 August. Marvelous time. The Demonstrators were as wide a variety as you can have and all were doing something really special for the conference. Everything was well thought out and executed by the Committee and the Volunteers. Big Thanks to All of them. Even the Conference program was well thought out, spiral bound, schedules, demonstrators bios, a few bits of blacksmith info and lined and graph paper for note taking. Perfect. I saw many taking advantage of them. So, it was time and money well spent as a conference and of course there is the added bonus that I was able to spend time with most of my friends from VAB that I haven’t seen in almost 2 years, literally I haven’t talked that much in 2 years and had a sore throat the entire time. I also got to meet several of my Facebook friends in person. There were lots more people who I should have met, but they were in my opinion overwhelmed by the crowds as demonstrators or simply too busy and I know how these events go, everyone wants a piece of everyone, so I missed probably more than a few. I can only hope they aren’t put off. Again the Conference was great! 2016 is going to be in Salt Lake City and planning will begin in earnest shortly, if you can volunteer for the committee let them know. It takes a lot of work and if they have enough hands then the burden isn’t so large on each.
Okay there’s me review and pitch for the ABANA conference. Here are a few photos of my friends and me.

Eric's trailer - camping as rough as I want it to be.

Eric’s trailer – camping as rough as I want it to be.

Me striking for Joe and his workmate

Me striking for Joe and his workmate

Me pointing out my nail.

Me pointing out my nail.

Joe at one of the workshops.

Joe at one of the workshops.

Matt likes the Fisher & Norris display

Matt likes the Fisher & Norris display

Joe pointing out his nail.

Joe pointing out his nail.

Bear, Donnie and Joe

Bear, Donnie and Joe

Everyone's happy we are in the Sat night dinner line. Matt, Joe (head), BobO and Eric.

Everyone’s happy we are in the Sat night dinner line. Matt, Joe (head), BobO and Eric.

I told you there they gave you a good portion Matt. I don't know BobO, maybe just a few more fries.

I told you there they gave you a good portion Matt. I don’t know BobO, maybe just a few more fries.

Do we really have to stay here and listen to this Joe?

Do we really have to stay here and listen to this Joe?

I've been training with Albanian women at the market. hahaha

I’ve been training with Albanian women at the market. hahaha

We know who to call next time Matt.

We know who to call next time Matt.

Eric's trailer - camping as rough as I want it to be.

Eric’s trailer – camping as rough as I want it to be.

Next post I will post some pics of the gallery and demo tents. Then it will be back to my mandolin building now that I have the tuners, strings and picks that I need.  Don’t worry eventually I will get back to doing some blacksmithing, I brought some files and hammers back with me and I have a few projects already lined up.

See ya at the Forge!!!

 

Hi Guys!

The process was pretty much the same this time around. This one I made in the new charcoal forge I made and it worked out very well. I made the members of the cross out of flat, twisted them and then flattened them back out again. I counter sunk and chiseled the hole for the rivet, which was a 4mm bolt with the head rounded over, cold, and then cut and hammered into place cold. Overall length of the cross is about 24 CM and 16 wide. I used a piece of galvanized for the INRI banner on top. I have an abundance of small pcs with nothing to do.
I guess the real big difference here was that I actually took the time to make new chisels – I used re-bar like I have hundreds of times in the past, but here the re-bar appears to be to soft. This is the first time I have ever been disappointed by a re-bar tool. In this case it was all three chisels. I think they started to mushroom out before the hammer hit them. Hahaha. Oh well. I finished the body of Christ up with my other chisels and will be making all my new chisels out of the either leaf spring or some breaker bar I have, but that is some big stuff to reduce for smaller sized chisels like I need.

Crucifix Front

Crucifix Front

The process went something like this – 4cm x 5mm thick x about 30 cm long. Mark out and cut arms, legs, head. Shape head first, then spread and shape arms. Mark the beard line and chisel and lift a little. A little fullering under the beard line will make it stand out more. Use chisel and punch to put eyes, nose and mouth on face. On the head and chest cavity you want to round it up on a stake tool to give it a more natural appearance. Flat will work, but rounding it gives a little better look.
Eyes should be about in the center of the face, mouth 2/3 from top and the nose between. This is using standard drawing sizing. Ears which are not an issue here, should be from the corner of the mouth to the outside corner of the eyes. Bodies should be about 7.5 times the size of the head and average shoulders 2 times the head height. So a 2cm long head = a 15 cm long neck to foot plus 2 cm for head for a total of 17 cm with a shoulder width of about 4 CM. Arms width is equal to about the total height for the figure finger tip to finger tip. Just for reference if you ever need it.
Okay back to the body, after I get the arms about right, I figure out the rib lines and fuller the stomach to give it a drawn in look and to define the chest cavity. I am concerned where the stomach section ends as I want to define the loincloth by having it raised a little from it. I add some fold lines and define where the legs enter the loincloth again fullering them a little to define them away from the cloth. Finish fullering the center of the legs I like to fuller it beyond the front on the backside, at an angle, so it gives a little better perception of depth for the legs. Finish rounding over the legs, slight indent for the knees and ankles, flatten feet a little, etc. These elements can be refined as much as you desire to. I wasn’t trying to make an exact replica of a body, but give the impression of one. Now I pick the lowest visible rib and use a chisel to impart a spear wound. I am done.
I use nails that I have squared up the heads a little and put them through the drilled holes in the hands and feet. I do the same for INRI placard. I trim the nails to length and bend over pulling them tight. I guess like anything else there are better ways to do this, but it holds the body very firmly from what I have seen so far and it isn’t seen hanging on the wall anyway. On a larger scaled crucifix you might want to actually forge some square and larger headed nails.

Crucifix Back - nails look like they stick out but they don't.

Crucifix Back – nails look like they stick out but they don’t.

 

Well hope you enjoyed the write up anyway. You know how it is sometimes when you are working, you just keep working and forget to take photos. At least I do. I am lucky I remember to put my touchmark on most things. I wound up putting it on cold. Oh well. I will do better next time, I will do better next time, I will do better next time. Hey I didn’t drift off to Kansas. hahaha. Til next time!

See ya at the Forge!!

Vince